dragons-on-mars:

This just brakes my heart…

You can see all of it here: http://www.plurk.com/p/ka4hfx
The Artist: 【鵜T踢】

(via lvypanda)

the-goddamazon:

thebluelip-blondie:

cyb3ranthy:

jean-luc-gohard:

cognitivedissonance:

Today in Ferguson, cops (without riot gear) oversaw a rally in support of Darren Wilson. I wish I could say this is unbelievable, but it’s not.

These are like the people who held picnics, smiling as families while black people swung from trees behind them.

I don’t know why anyone is surprised. 

when Darren Wilson gets convicted I bet these pigs will riot

But he won’t get convicted. Rumor has it his uncle in the mayor of Ferguson.

(Source: twitter.com, via feminism5ever)

thepeoplesrecord:

One year anniversary of the murder of Islan Nettles: How long will we wait for justice?August 17, 2014
Sunday marks one year since 21-year-old Islan Nettles was brutally killed on a street near her home in Harlem. Nettles, an African-American transgender woman, was a design intern at a fashion company. She was beaten to death in the early hours of Aug. 17, in the shadow of the NYPD Housing Bureau’s Service Area 6 .
Yet she — and transgender people around New York City and the world — are still waiting for justice from the NYPD and Manhattan District Attorney. Activity in the investigation, if there has been any, remains shrouded behind a disturbing veil of secrecy.
Nettles had been walking with a group of transgender friends when they came upon a group of young men who subjected them to catcalls and harassment of a type familiar to many women in New York City.
But the catcalling took a violent turn when the men apparently realized that she and her friends were transgender.
Nettles was beaten badly enough that she needed to be hospitalized. At the hospital, she lapsed into a coma. Four days later, she was brain dead. Life support was turned off. She was gone.
While she was in the hospital, the police arrested her alleged assailant. Witnesses reported that he had pushed Nettles to the ground, climbed on top of her and beat her repeatedly while screaming anti-gay and anti-transgender slurs.
Despite this, he was charged only with misdemeanor assault. Of course, Nettles hadn’t yet died at the time of his arrest, and he therefore couldn’t be charged with anything related to her death. But it was still difficult to shake the feeling that the authorities did not take this attack very seriously.
After Nettles died, charges were dropped against this assailant. The expectation was that new charges would be brought against him stemming from her death.
Those never came.
Instead, it appeared that the investigation lost steam. Explanations floated around. The one most commonly heard was that a second man had stepped forward claiming responsibility for killing Islan, but that he was too drunk to remember it clearly.
The various accounts only compound the sense that prosecuting the man who killed Nettles in what is by all appearances a hate crime simply isn’t a priority for the police and district attorney.
In November, the Manhattan DA’s office stated that it was still “aggressively investigating” Nettles’ death.
But the investigation hardly feels aggressive. It’s been a year and there has been little visible effort spent on finding justice.
For the transgender community — scarred by a long and difficult history of violence and an often uneasy relationship with law enforcement — the vacuum of information makes reasonable community members question whether or not resources are truly being directed towards this investigation.
After a year of claims about their commitment to justice, it’s time for officials to become more transparent about their investigation.
Transgender people, and transgender women of color in particular, face harassment and violence on a regular basis. All too often, crimes committed against them go unpunished.
But their lives matter. Islan Nettles’ life mattered. It mattered to her friends, to her family and to her community.
Every day, I work with many transgender women of color like Nettles who astound me with their strength and resilience in the face of widespread discrimination and violence and seeming indifference from authorities.
Transgender people are gaining more visibility, acceptance and legal protection every day. But violence remains a daily part of life. We must demand accountability from law enforcement and an end to anti-transgender violence and discrimination.
Source
Islan Nettles is yet another trans sister whose life will not be forgotten. Demand justice now!
Rally to Honor the Legacy of Islan NettlesSunday, August 17th, 2014 3:30 p.m.Across from the police precinct, 147th street and Frederick Douglas BLVD

thepeoplesrecord:

One year anniversary of the murder of Islan Nettles: How long will we wait for justice?
August 17, 2014

Sunday marks one year since 21-year-old Islan Nettles was brutally killed on a street near her home in Harlem. Nettles, an African-American transgender woman, was a design intern at a fashion company. She was beaten to death in the early hours of Aug. 17, in the shadow of the NYPD Housing Bureau’s Service Area 6 .

Yet she — and transgender people around New York City and the world — are still waiting for justice from the NYPD and Manhattan District Attorney. Activity in the investigation, if there has been any, remains shrouded behind a disturbing veil of secrecy.

Nettles had been walking with a group of transgender friends when they came upon a group of young men who subjected them to catcalls and harassment of a type familiar to many women in New York City.

But the catcalling took a violent turn when the men apparently realized that she and her friends were transgender.

Nettles was beaten badly enough that she needed to be hospitalized. At the hospital, she lapsed into a coma. Four days later, she was brain dead. Life support was turned off. She was gone.

While she was in the hospital, the police arrested her alleged assailant. Witnesses reported that he had pushed Nettles to the ground, climbed on top of her and beat her repeatedly while screaming anti-gay and anti-transgender slurs.

Despite this, he was charged only with misdemeanor assault. Of course, Nettles hadn’t yet died at the time of his arrest, and he therefore couldn’t be charged with anything related to her death. But it was still difficult to shake the feeling that the authorities did not take this attack very seriously.

After Nettles died, charges were dropped against this assailant. The expectation was that new charges would be brought against him stemming from her death.

Those never came.

Instead, it appeared that the investigation lost steam. Explanations floated around. The one most commonly heard was that a second man had stepped forward claiming responsibility for killing Islan, but that he was too drunk to remember it clearly.

The various accounts only compound the sense that prosecuting the man who killed Nettles in what is by all appearances a hate crime simply isn’t a priority for the police and district attorney.

In November, the Manhattan DA’s office stated that it was still “aggressively investigating” Nettles’ death.

But the investigation hardly feels aggressive. It’s been a year and there has been little visible effort spent on finding justice.

For the transgender community — scarred by a long and difficult history of violence and an often uneasy relationship with law enforcement — the vacuum of information makes reasonable community members question whether or not resources are truly being directed towards this investigation.

After a year of claims about their commitment to justice, it’s time for officials to become more transparent about their investigation.

Transgender people, and transgender women of color in particular, face harassment and violence on a regular basis. All too often, crimes committed against them go unpunished.

But their lives matter. Islan Nettles’ life mattered. It mattered to her friends, to her family and to her community.

Every day, I work with many transgender women of color like Nettles who astound me with their strength and resilience in the face of widespread discrimination and violence and seeming indifference from authorities.

Transgender people are gaining more visibility, acceptance and legal protection every day. But violence remains a daily part of life. We must demand accountability from law enforcement and an end to anti-transgender violence and discrimination.

Source

Islan Nettles is yet another trans sister whose life will not be forgotten. Demand justice now!

Rally to Honor the Legacy of Islan Nettles
Sunday, August 17th, 2014 3:30 p.m.

Across from the police precinct, 147th street and Frederick Douglas BLVD

(via feminism5ever)

a-ga-li-ha:

10 Photos from Ferguson that won’t make it to the mainstream media.

A community in unity.These photos are via Twitter from a Journalist named Ryan Schuessler (@RyanSchuessler1) who unlike some journalists/reporters, chooses to focus on the activities truly going on right now. He’s not focusing on how much of a “hell-hole” some of them are reporting it to supposedly be. But a community of people who are just seeking Justice For Michael BrownIf you can look at these photos and still buy into the mainsteam media’s game, or feel sorry for the police here in the slightest bit - you’re not paying attention.

The anger and actions of the people in Ferguson are justified. They’re citizens who are outraged by the corruption of the justice system and by the fact these police forces are allowed to gas them and shoot into crowds of innocent civilians, whenever they’re rallying in a peaceful protest that the media refuses to expose. They’ll try to turn it around on these people as often as possible.

For those of us who are, and have been paying attention to what’s going on - to the people of Ferguson, hat’s off to you for standing up. Know there are people who know the truth and aren’t listening to what news sources like CNN, FoxNews and NBC are distorting the information into.

DO NOT FALL INTO THE ILLUSIONS AND DISTORTIONS OF THE MAIN STREAM MEDIA ABOUT THE EVENTS IN FERGUSON. DO NOT FALL PREY TO THEIR GAME.

THESE PEOPLE ARE STANDING AGAINST A CORRUPT POLICE FORCE THAT GOT CAUGHT UP IN THEIR OWN LIES. DO NOT JUST FALL INTO THE STORIES OF TEAR GAS, RUBBER BULLETS, RIOTS, and LOOTERS. THERE ARE EVENTS GOING ON FROM PEACEFUL PROTESTERS WHO ARE STANDING FOR JUSTICE.

@RyanSchuessler1 - Twitter

(via feminism5ever)

kingjaffejoffer:

Right now in Ferguson
Curfew isn’t for 2 and a half more hours

kingjaffejoffer:

Right now in Ferguson

Curfew isn’t for 2 and a half more hours

(via feminism5ever)

ras-al-ghul-is-dead:

A silent protest in Love Park, downtown Philadelphia orchestrated by performance artists protesting the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson. The onslaught of passerby’s  wanting to take photos with the statue exemplifies the disconnect in American society.  Simply frame out the dead body, and it doesn’t exist.  

Here are some observations by one of the artists involved in the event:

I don’t know who any of these folks are.

They were tourists I presume.

But I heard most of what everything they said. A few lines in particular stood out. There’s one guy not featured in the photos. His friends were trying to get him to join the picture but he couldn’t take his eyes off the body.

"Something about this doesn’t feel right. I’m going to sit this one out, guys." "Com’on man… he’s already dead."

(Laughs.)

There were a billion little quips I heard today. Some broke my heart. Some restored my faith in humanity. There was an older white couple who wanted to take a picture under the statue.

The older gentleman: “Why do they have to always have to shove their politics down our throats.” Older woman: “They’re black kids, honey. They don’t have anything better to do.”

One woman even stepped over the body to get her picture. But as luck would have it the wind blew the caution tape and it got tangle around her foot. She had to stop and take the tape off. She still took her photo.

There was a guy who yelled at us… “We need more dead like them. Yay for the white man!”

"One young guy just cried and then gave me a hug and said ‘thank you. It’s nice to know SOMEBODY sees me.’

(via feminism5ever)

wiredsociety:

Journalists Tim Pool and Alice Speri had boots on the ground at the Ferguson protest where police enforced a curfew tonight that lead to protesters getting tear gassed

https://twitter.com/alicesperi
https://twitter.com/Timcast
https://twitter.com/AnonymousPress

huffingtonpost:

When The Media Treats White Suspects And Killers Better Than Black Victims

On the afternoon of Aug. 9, a police officer fatally shot an unarmed, black teenager, Michael Brown, in Ferguson, Missouri. Details remain in dispute. Eyewitnesses have said that Brown was compliant with police and was shot while he had his hands up. Police maintain that the 18-year-old had assaulted an officer and was reaching for the officer’s gun.

For more headlines go here.

moriartystyles:

xamity:

naturalisse:

illustratographer:

I took a photo every 2 minutes over the span of about 2 hours at a 20 second exposure and animated it all together! This 2 second loop was the result! 
Craters of the Moon National Monument, Idaho

HOLY FUCK

holy fuck you can actually see how the earth turns by paying attention to the stars

this fucks me the fuck up

moriartystyles:

xamity:

naturalisse:

illustratographer:

I took a photo every 2 minutes over the span of about 2 hours at a 20 second exposure and animated it all together! This 2 second loop was the result! 

Craters of the Moon National Monument, Idaho

HOLY FUCK

holy fuck you can actually see how the earth turns by paying attention to the stars

this fucks me the fuck up

(via drawesome37)